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Educational Trunk Lesson in Action

Education Committee News – February 2018

by Gail Shay Linne, Education Chair The Education Committee designed the ‘Adopt-a-School’ program during our January meeting. The program’s intent is to increase teachers’ access to the educational trunks so that students have the opportunity to learn about birds, conservation and local habitat. We hope Flathead Audubon members will adopt a school. Involvement can be […]

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Bufflehead - Photo Credit: Dick Walker

Bufflehead

by Cory Davis Who doesn’t love to see that bright white head popping up on a mountain lake on a gray day? “There’s a bufflehead!” Always one of the easiest ducks to identify, even the females are distinctive with a conspicuous, white cheek patch. Appropriately for Montana, their name refers to the large buffalo-like shaped […]

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Pileated Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

By Karen Nichols & Ben Long Big, raucous and handsome, the pileated woodpecker is a favorite of hard-core birding enthusiasts and casual nature-lovers alike. The pileated woodpecker is the classic “Woody Woodpecker.” The word “pileated” refers to its bright red crest, its most distinguishing feature. The name may be pronounced either “PIE-leh-ated” or “PIL-eh-ated.” The […]

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Wood Duck

Wood Duck vs Harlequin Duck

By John Ashley There are only two serious contenders for the most dazzling duck in western Montana. The male Wood Duck and male Harlequin Duck are easily our most decked-out waterfowl. But other than looking outrageously handsome, there are surprisingly few similarities between these two Montana natives. Trying to describe the feathers on these fellows […]

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Flicker

Northern Flicker

By Lisa Bate See a flash of red-orange from a flying bird, hear the familiar “flicka, flicka, flicka” call and I know that one of my favorite birds has just landed. It is the Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)! This species is unmistakable in the field because the lower surface of its wings and tail are […]

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